Reading Discussion Group

Attention Deficit ---Oh look, a duck... and success in college.

 
 
Picture of Jill Carlson
Attention Deficit ---Oh look, a duck... and success in college.
by Jill Carlson - Tuesday, 6 April 2010, 11:07 AM
 

 Research has shown that only 5% of students with attention deficits will complete a degree program compared to over 41% of students without such deficits (Barkely, 1990).

This is a scary figure. I like how they gave concrete and valuable techniques on how to help our students with this.   In addition to what was outlined, are there any other things you have tried that have proven successful?

Calendars and Planners

notebook organization

note taking strategies

visual organizational maps

visual manipulative's

mnemonic devices

clarifying questions

feedback

and to play devils advocate-- Why try if only 5% succeed?

Picture of Laura Prettyman
Re: Attention Deficit ---Oh look, a duck... and success in college.
by Laura Prettyman - Tuesday, 6 April 2010, 3:52 PM
 

Jill, your heading made me LOL! ; )

I was really surprised when I read that only 5% of students with attention deficits complete a degree (the 41% success rate isn't impressing me, either, though)! Do you think it is safe to say that a majority of students in our classrooms have an attention deficit problem to some degree? I'm thinking of the students I'm working with right now, and most of them really have trouble concentrating.

I think I've used most of these strategies with students.  Mnemonic devices seem to work well, as do any kind of visual manipulatives.

 As a teacher, I think you have to use them consistently to help students develop the habit of using them. It is very important to teach organizational and note taking strategies. Many of our students don't have a clue about taking notes! I used to think that study skills are something students can pick up on their own, but I was wrong. I find that students need very explicit instruction and consistent practice before they can take good notes or organize their study time. This can be tough in my classroom, because I don't feel like I spend a lot of time actually lecturing.

As for the "why try if only 5% succeed" part of your question, I think we have to try because if makes such a big difference to that 5%. When I was a junior in high school, my goal was to graduate and then get a job on the assembly line of a small factory in my hometown. I never saw myself as capable of going to college until a concerned guidance counselor took the time to encourage me to continue my education past high school. I can't imagine where I'd be today without her support. We don't always know how we are influencing students, but I know we are changing lives. (Wow, I am sappy this afternoon, huh?)

Picture of Tracy Chase
Re: Attention Deficit ---Oh look, a duck... and success in college.
by Tracy Chase - Thursday, 8 April 2010, 12:45 PM
 

.....to play devils advocate.....is it really attention deficit or is it bad behavior? 

5% completion rate is alarming...Many things run through my mind when I hear statistics of this nature.  Why try?  A part of me says 5% is better than 4%.....on the flipside, a lot of money is going out with little to show for it.....

I have attention deficit students- those who went through the diagnosis process, as well as students who were never formally diagnosed.  Working with students who have problems with concentration and attention can prove difficult.  However, I have found being concrete has helped.  When the students know what is expected and when it is expected of them, being successful seems to follow suit.  Breaking the assignments up has worked well.  I like mnemonic devices- I still remember the ROYGBIV acronym from my school days.  Feedback, feedback, feedback is critical.  The benefit of being in a smaller site also allows me to be very focused on the student and his or her needs.

Picture of Laura Prettyman
Re: Attention Deficit ---Oh look, a duck... and success in college.
by Laura Prettyman - Monday, 12 April 2010, 11:07 AM
 

LOL! I have wondered the same thing about attention deficit vs. bad behavior sometimes, Tracy!

I have found that breaking thing down into small steps, even little tiny baby steps, sometimes can be a big help.